Adriana Chede on Creating Timeless Classics and Why Simple Doesn’t Always Equal Boring.

From quintessential bands to emerald stoned chains, Adriana’s work takes blueprint designs and forms them into contemporary statements, minus the fuss. [...]

From quintessential bands to emerald stoned chains, Adriana’s work takes blueprint designs and forms them into contemporary statements, minus the fuss.  

To produce responsible and practical jewellery that still imitates the glamour of classic bijouterie is a complicated concept for most. That is, unless, you have a lifelong vision like Adriana. After studying Jewellery Design at Parsons Paris – in addition to sporting myriad career experience under her belt – São Paulo-born, Adriana Chede, knew that her eponymous label would become an extension of her own perspectives and values from the outset.

Describing her brand as “timeless jewellery with Brazilian soul”, Adriana took her heritage overseas when choosing to settle in London, with the intention of creating something universally classic and wearable that still honoured her roots.

As the fine-jewellery market finds itself within the midst of an outpouring of demand for precious pieces that last a lifetime, Adriana’s designs are curated with both beauty and functionality in mind, proving that easy to wear moulds shouldn’t have to compromise on aesthetics. But shoppers are now searching for something that runs deeper than the surface level adornment; enter, sustainable treasures that are kind to the environment. Though customers needn’t be sceptical about Adriana’s approach towards ecological ethics; every order is individually handmade from 100% recycled gold, tapping straight into this new wave of earth-aware consumers.   

Recording every step of the design and production process for her Instagram following, Adriana proves how behind even the simplest of craftsmanship is a highly-skilled maverick.  And with the option of personalisation for the more cherished moments, the brand epitomises everything that jewellery should be for an individual; private, revered, and authentically intimate.

What / who are your influential drivers behind the brand?

“I started the business when I was 18, I knew nothing about being an entrepreneur, but I knew jewellery was a passion. Coming from a half-Lebanese family allowed me to experience moments where jewellery was used to celebrate love and our achievements. They would also be passed down to other generations, taking with them the stories they hold.”

How do you wish your customers to feel when wearing your jewellery? 

“I design pieces that should be worn every day as a kind of second skin or little talismans. The jewellery is delicate yet timeless, made to last a lifetime (if not longer). I want my jewellery to make women feel their best, to empower their qualities and accompany them to all their activities.”

What does jewellery mean to you? 

“I love jewellery. I love creating pieces that will be used and carried by women, and therefore become part of their lives. That feeling of creating a new piece or making each one of them by hand is really special to me.

To think that they are a part of nature – the metals and the gemstones – and we shape and mould them into something wearable is so beautiful. Because I see them this way, it’s also so important for me to do it in the most conscious and sustainable way as possible.”

How was it navigating a small business during a pandemic?

“Well, it asked for creativity, like finding new ways, adapting, and being more present online, but it was also very positive! I feel like it helped me to see new opportunities and use them to make my ideas work.”

What would your advice be to women in the small business sector?

“To be patient and constant. I feel like there is nothing like hard work and time. If you put the right amount of work and passion, then the results will come.

There were times where I felt like it was going slow, but I never thought about giving up. If you want something, you got to give all of you to make it happen. And good things happen.”

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Beth Ryder
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