Sleep Issues During Quarantine – 5 Tips to Getting a Better Night’s Sleep

Getting a good night’s sleep is difficult for many people at the best of times. [...]

Getting a good night’s sleep is difficult for many people at the best of times. Right now, there’s more stress due to the quarantine period where we’re mostly restricted to our homes. 

Unfortunately, if sleep issues are allowed to continue, it can lead to other problems like being overly tired, impatient, and irritable with others in the household. This only makes quarantine more difficult to bear.

Therefore, we felt it would be useful to suggest 5 tips for how to get a better night’s sleep if you’re struggling right now.

Sleeping Posture Planning for Better Sleep

People are front, back or side sleepers. Each type of sleeper requires a different pillow and mattress to support their body posture. 

For instance, if you sleep on your side, a supportive mattress must cushion your side and rib cage adequately. A hard mattress will be difficult to sleep on as a side sleeper and so a replacement should be sought. Also, if you’re a side sleeper, a plumper pillow is required (not a low rise one) because there’s a gap between your body and your head when lying sideways. 

Getting the right mattress and pillow supports whatever sleeping posture you naturally have. Indeed, it’ll continue to be difficult to sleep well without it. 

Create Reliable Routines

We all rely on routines to get us through the day. We have a morning routine, what we plan to do at lunchtime and then evening and nighttime routines too. They help to maintain good habits and provide some consistency to life. 

Being in quarantine, it messes up many of your daily habits. Even the fact that you may not need to wake at 6 am to get ready for your workday commute is different now.

Create new routines that adapt to the current situation, but don’t change what still works for you, because it creates a sense of normalcy when other things are so out of whack. 

Find Ways to Exercise

When you’re quarantined, then you cannot go out to the park to exercise, but that doesn’t mean that you should stop exercising altogether; for example, one man ran a marathon on the balcony of his apartment building.

While you don’t have to go that far, there are plenty of exercises you can perform indoors which will get your heart pumping faster, clear your mind and take you away from the current situation.

If you don’t have a kettlebell or dumbbells at home, use bags of rice or something else that you can lift up and down instead. Try to be positive and adaptable to find alternative ways to move more. It’ll do you the world of good. 

Reduce the Noise Factor

Is a housemate keeping you awake in the evening or a family member watching late-night TV? Is there a solution to the noise to reduce it? You could talk with them about using a pair of wireless headphones if they must watch late-night TV or to reduce the volume after a certain hour. 

A pair of earplugs will help to block out some of the noise that’s reaching your bedroom and will reduce its effects on your sleep pattern. Also, if outside disturbances are the cause of bad sleep, then they’ll help with this too. 

Meditate in the Evening

If your mind won’t slow down with racing thoughts because of the COVID-19 stress, then go in the opposite direction by learning to meditate.

There are excellent meditation apps like Calm and Headspace which provide visual and auditory stimulation to let you relax more. The music they play has a calming effect. Taking your mind off the day’s events encourages you to relax before bedtime. This makes getting off to sleep far more likely.

We’d also suggest limiting your intake of daily news media to 30 minutes a day. Trying to keep up with updates about the virus only adds more stress; you need less of it to sleep better.

More in…

Laura Bartlett

More in ...

Scroll to Top